Congrats to Rachael Rivera, 2018 Library Journal Mover & Shaker


Congrats to Rachael Rivera! I have been a fan of Rachael’s work in public libraries, specifically the work she’s done with the homeless population who uses the library at the Auckland Library in Auckland, NZ. Her work is caring, compassionate, and people first. I am very excited to see more of Rachael’s great work in libraries and I hope that she inspires you like she has me.

Here is the text of her M&S nomination:

Tell us your reasons for this nomination. Please feel free to include links to the nominees’ projects or articles that further describe their work:

Through her work as the Manager of Customer Experience at the Central City Library, Rachael has transformed the library in Auckland towards a people centered, human experience that shows every user that the library is there to support them and their needs any way.

There are many reasons I am nominating Rachael, but this one stands out to me most: Rachael cares about people, and I believe that this is the number one quality that a person needs to work in libraries these days. Gone are the days where “I really love books” is the number one reason to be a librarian, I believe Rachael’s people first approach is a shining example of the attitude librarians and those coming into the profession need.

I have been following Rachael’s work for many years now, but in November 2015 I finally had a chance to meet her at the 2015 LIANZA Annual Conference in Wellington, NZ. Rachael was just as I expected her…full of life, full of love, and a person that exudes caring and positivity. We need more people in the library world….heck, the entire world….to be like Rachael!

A home for the homeless: Rachael Rivera and the Auckland Library Streeties

Rachael’s work as the Manager of Customer Experience at the Central City Library in Auckland NZ has included one of the best library programs I have seen: outreach for the homeless population in Auckland with movie nights and discussions. Think about it: what is one of the biggest things that homeless populations need? They need a space where they can relax, stay warm or cool off, and escape life on the streets. A movie night and discussion event for the homeless in Auckland does just that and it also has another added bonus: it creates community among the homeless population. Bringing people together over a film and discussion brings them together, giving them a place to communicate in a free and open environment. Friendships can be made during these events, friendships that could help a homeless person out in the long run. Libraries may be best known for loaning out books, but we’ve been building connections between people for just as long. This program shows the kind of connections librarians need to build.

Describe one attribute or characteristic that illustrates nominee’s unique ability:*

During the 2017 LIANZA Conference in Christchurch NZ, Rachael gave a presentation about the importance of serving homeless populations in public libraries. This talk spurred on some conversation among people at the conference, and the debate even spilled out into the national news!

LIANZA #Open2017 – Future Sound of Libraries / The Process, pt. 3

In a situation like this, where conference attendees and the national news came out against Rachael’s ideas, Rachael remained calm, collected, and carried out her message professional and, just like Rachael, with kindness. You can listen to her response at the link below:

Rachael Rivera: ‘Our rough sleeping community are voracious readers’

She handled this situation with so much kindness and caring. Her response helped move the debate along, and in a way, nicely quieted those that may brush off homeless populations who use public libraries.

Nominated by Justin Hoenke and Matt Finch









Abigail Foster's Photosynthesis Machine, Benson Memorial Library, Family, Libraries, Library Director, Life, Management, Titusville, PA

Where Are We Now?

About a year ago I hung up a bizarre painting in my office at work. To me it was perfect and just familiar enough that I thought it warranted a place in my life. As a person who always thought it would be neat to have an office and fill it with interesting things, the painting, when mixed with the Lego creations and drawings that Finn and Aero have created for me over the years, helped me establish this place my home away from home. When I feel comfortable at work, I usually am able to some really good and meaningful work. On the other hand I could also see how the average “I shop for my groceries at Walmart every Saturday at 1pm and have to watch the game and/or my sitcom at the same time every week” American person would be appalled by it.

One day I came into work to find that my painting was taken down. My coworkers took it down because, yes they were terrified and appalled by it. I guess right now would also be a good time to explain that due to limited space we’re all basically working on top of each other and that we’re surrounded by glass. It’s like a packed fishbowl in here. But to fully admit my feelings, I was pretty let down by their actions. It felt passive aggressive and overall it felt unkind. But in the moment I didn’t react. I just went on and say “oh, well that happened.”

You see as a Gemini I feel a duality to everything. There’s this part of me that always sees things from my point of view and then I almost immediately put that aside and see it from how others may have seen it. In this case: Justin likes the painting and hangs up the painting, Justin feels disappointed when someone takes that painting down, but then Justin instantly forgets about that and says “well I bet they didn’t like the painting so I understand that and what I thought about the painting shouldn’t matter because that’s selfish to only think about myself.” Over time, I’ve taken that approach to even more of an extreme: I guess in a way that by my coworkers actions I was able to put the painting to a much better use. It became the cover for my album Prozac Is The Dam And I Am The Dynamite, and I think it fit really well for that album. Having the painting taken down by my coworkers made me take it home, where I stared at it more and through those hours of staring it gave the painting more meaning and purpose. It became a visual representation of my life at the time, and when it merged together with the music I was creating it became a complete package.

You take all of these things together, stretch everything out by a few months, sometimes years, and what happens? You start to think about the first part (yourself) less and less until it almost becomes silly to even think about it in the first place. I think that’s where I am at now…after awhile of doing this here I am, a person that may be very capable about thinking of others but at the same time a person who doesn’t think of himself as much as he should. I’m overwhelmed right now and a bell goes off in my brain to remind me that this may be part of the reason as to why I feel this way. When you neglect yourself in some way, it all adds up. I stare at a lot of spreadsheets these days, and I like to think that my soul has a spreadsheet where it has been keeping note of the times I’ve put myself aside for others. It’s finally getting to that point where the spreadsheet is just too long and unruly and it becomes a hassle to scroll down the page because there’s so much data.

I’m on the cusp of something here. It feels exciting and at the same time it fills my soul with great fear, but I know that as with everything in this life it will come, it will go, and the next thing will happen. I feel lucky to be able to share this journey here and to have others be able to maybe understand and maybe feel like they may be in the same holding pattern at the moment.

Music: David Bowie “Where Are We Now?” As long as there’s sun..As long as there’s rain..As long as there’s fire..As long as there’s me..As long as there’s you

Libraries, Library Director, Management


I know there are probably studies out there that help prove that just a little bit of kindness can go a long way and that kindness does in fact have a monetary value. I know that the whole “be nice to everyone and in return kindness will come to you” is a bit of a hippy dippy idea but I still believe in it. And here’s a good example of that in action


An organization was looking into one of our meeting rooms and inquired about if they’d have to pay to use the space. In the end, it all came down to the idea that they’d have to pay the $20 meeting room fee. I was hesitant to charge them the feed because I always want to do my best to help people out and money can complicate things, but in this case the fee was something we could not avoid. We talked about it and everything moved forward with the $20 fee in place.

This morning I received payment for the meeting room use which (as you can see above) went above the $20 fee that was originally requested. It put quite a smile on my face and in my heart to see this extra donation to the library as well as the kind note that came with it. Yes, I can honestly say that this made my day.

When we have an open communication with others and be positive and kind, good things come in return. Libraries, please keep this in mind as you grow, create policy, and work with your community. We’re in this TOGETHER.

Libraries, Teens


I want passion! I want excitement! I want bold and inspiring statements and ideas from human beings! This month, Library Journal delivered in THREE ways. Here they are. Read them, share them, and be inspired to be a great positive force in your world.

Adversary or Ally? The trouble with fines and fees by Rebecca T. Miller


COPY AND PASTE all text by Rebecca because this is very important: Ultimately, we must reflect upon our bond with the people libraries are designed to serve. Interactions with patrons can become about the fine or fee, instead of the need addressed by the service. This risks turning librarians and clerks into cops and collection agents and diverting backroom capacity to fee and fine maintenance. In the process, it can set up an adversarial relationship between the library and its users rather than forging an alliance that supports a vibrant interchange. I vote for the library as ally rather than as adversary. Read the full article here. Good job Rebecca.

Barbie Bod Mods by Lisa Mudrakoff and Sasha Schertzer


A program that is not only FUN but a program that engages youth and gets them to think is a library program that I love and want to sing about from the rooftops.

Over the course of the program, we witnessed participants building a community of young people from all over the city, with relationships developing naturally as the teens worked on their dolls side by side. Some older teens, still working through their own identities, nevertheless found themselves mentoring the younger teens as they talked about their questions and struggles.

FANTASTIC JOB Lisa and Sasha. Read the full article here.

Speak of the Devil by Michael Stephens


The term devil’s advocate is defined as a role meant to encourage discussion of an issue from all sides by taking an unpopular approach. However, I fear it’s become something different. Many have come to understand that when we say “play devil’s advocate,” it’s a passive-aggressive way of bringing a point up without it looking like it’s our own. Same goes for those who blanket their opinions with, “Others are saying this about that….”

Michael is spot on here (he usually is with his ideas. I enjoy him very much). Don’t be the person that brings negativity into an otherwise healthy situation. I believe in debate and discussion and openness, but it doesn’t have to happen all of the time. Roll with the positive.




Libraries, Life, Misc., Social Media, Things


I hold my hand over my heart when a big change happens at my library. I want to protect myself from the inevitable onslaught of “why would you do such a thing?” I take things to heart because my motives and ideas come from a very pure place. I assure you that I’m not evil, nor this is some kind of coup d’ etat. My motives and ideas come from a very pure place: the reason for change is because the change helps the library (and the community) move forward and remain relevant in our heads and in our hearts.


In the middle of a giant project which brings about great change, I may lash out and say that “I HATE EVERYTHING” and that “I DON’T BELIEVE IN THE PUBLIC LIBRARY”. I say I don’t care but I do care. I’m a human being. My emotions fluctuate wildly from day to day. As I write this post I am up and feeling well! By 2pm, however, my mood may change to something bleak. And then 5pm may hit and it may go back the other way. We are all human beings (I think!) and we all fluctuate. One of our new jobs in this world full of social media and 24 hour news cycles should be to not point out every single one of each others missteps or snafus. We all make mistakes. We shouldn’t crucify _______ (insert person of the moment) for something that they may have said back in 1985. We should go to the person in the moment and talk to them and accept them for who they are at this moment. We have our moments. Those moments pass. We should focus on the present and bring joy into that moment.

giphy (1)
Mr. Bowie we really miss you.

The thing that I’m learning to do is to cope with everything in the moment and do it much better than I have in the past. This is easier said than done but if I am mindful throughout the process I’ll get better at it. Growing older helps me with this process. As I age, my body and my mind slow down a bit and this helps prevent overreaction. It allows the present moment to fully exist in time.

Libraries, Portland, ME

Thank You

Five minutes ago, a boy (age 7-10) and his Mom walked through the Teen Library.  I wished them both good morning and in return they handed the following card to me and smiled:


Libraries, Portland, ME

The Important Stuff

We all get down when it comes to working libraries sometimes.  But just as soon as we get down, there’s always the library member to pick us back up and remind us why we’re doing this.  It’s for the community.  It’s to make these places we live in a better place for us all.

I got a few  birthday cards last week and I wanted to share them with you because they helped remind me why I’m working in a library.  I hope they can do the same for you!